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NEW YORK — Are you excited to check out the latest round of potential blockbusters or Oscar winners coming to theaters this year? Or are you more content re-watching “The Empire Strikes Back” for the 150th time? It appears most Americans can’t help but turn back time and watch the classics when it comes to pandemic entertainment. A recent survey of 2,000 adults finds seven in 10 are feeling more nostalgic than ever before.

On average, Americans have re-watched a staggering 30 TV episodes and 14 movies during the pandemic. So, which timeless shows and movies are people catching up on again? The top TV series Americans are replaying over and over is “Seinfeld” (18%). The classic sitcom was followed by “Game of Thrones” (17%), “Friends” (17%), “The Office” (16%), and “I Love Lucy” (16%). Other favorites include “The Twilight Zone” (17%), “The Walking Dead” (12%), “South Park” (11%), “The Simpsons” (10%), and “Breaking Bad” (8%).

Dinosaurs rule the Hollywood re-watch party

When it comes to classic films getting a re-watch during the pandemic, “Jurassic Park” tops the charts (26%). “Indiana Jones” (19%), “Die Hard” (19%), “Home Alone” (18%), and “Back to the Future” (16%) are not far behind in the poll. Other big name movie franchises are also getting another watch in quarantine, including Marvel’s “Iron Man” (14%), “Star Wars” (12%), “Guardians of the Galaxy” (12%), and “The Matrix” films (11%).

This research, put together by Canvaspop, also asked respondents what else they’ve been feeling nostalgic about over the last year. Many say they pine for the days of easily seeing friends and family (30%), while others miss attending big events like weddings (17%).

Interestingly, 67 percent of adults say all the nostalgia they’ve been feeling lately has motivated them to start redecorating their home. Three in 10 people put up new wall art that reminds them of the past and 28 percent bought new furniture. Others invested in higher-quality pictures and displays of past family outings and events (23%) and one in five put up some old movie posters.

A quarter of Americans have indulged in a “nostalgic purchase” since the pandemic began. While 30 percent of that group bought memorabilia, another 30 percent spent their money on new prints of past vacations or personal events.

Plenty of Americans also seem to miss the days of filling photo albums and decorative frames. More than three in four (78%) say they wish they had more physical photos to look over as opposed to digital files.

The survey was conducted by OnePoll.

About John Anderer

Born blue in the face, John has been writing professionally for over a decade and covering the latest scientific research for StudyFinds since 2019. His work has been featured by Business Insider, Eat This Not That!, MSN, Ladders, and Yahoo!

Studies and abstracts can be confusing and awkwardly worded. He prides himself on making such content easy to read, understand, and apply to one’s everyday life.

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