The hand holds a medical and protective mask with the word GOODBYE 2020. Concept of coronavirus quarantine. Prevent or stop the spread of the COVID-19 worldwide.

(© daily_creativity - stock.adobe.com)

NEW YORK — From the pandemic to the presidential election, there’s no question 2020 has been a turning point moment in United States history. Unfortunately, most believe the year’s problems haven’t left them in a good position moving forward. A new survey finds nearly eight in 10 Americans say 2020 caused an existential crisis for the country.

The OnePoll survey asked 2,000 Americans about their experiences throughout this tumultuous year and finds that 77 percent agree 2020 has sent the U.S. into crisis over its identity. Baby boomers are the most likely to agree with this statement (82%), compared to 76 percent of Generation X and 75 percent of millennial respondents.
2020 America
As America deals with its major issues, it’s no surprise that 65 percent of respondents feel like they’ve had their own personal crisis at some point during 2020. The survey, commissioned by Vejo, finds 68 percent of Americans said the year has left them feeling defeated.

The top event leaving 63 percent of respondents feeling defeated entering 2021 is, of course, the COVID-19 pandemic. Not being able to enjoy pre-COVID activities (45%) followed far between the virus. Another 45 percent of respondents cited the presidential election and 35 percent said the spread of misinformation relating to coronavirus is their top cause of exhaustion in 2020. Another three in 10 respondents add the 24/7 news cycle has taken a toll on them this year.

2020’s impact on our health

With all of these events adding up, over half of respondents have felt too overwhelmed throughout the year to take proper care of their health and wellness. Fifty-six percent said they’ve been struggling now more than ever to find a wellness routine that works for them.

2020 Existential Crisis

Nearly six in 10 people (57%) say they do want to learn more about how to improve their health and learn more about their body’s nutritional needs, but they don’t know where to start. A further 64 percent confess it’s sometimes inconvenient for them to follow a healthy lifestyle and 55 percent say they just don’t have enough time in the day.

Sixty-two percent of respondents also shared they struggle to find the motivation to try a new routine. Once they do find the motivation, however, 57 percent reveal they can’t seem to follow through with these new routines in the long run.

“Incorporating healthy habits into your daily routine is essential for a healthy lifestyle,” says Dr. Jan Vonhoegen, M.D., Medical Director for VEJO+ Global, in a statement. “Physical activity, a diet of whole fruits and vegetables, and a good night’s sleep are the foundation of holistic health and happiness.”

Half of the respondents said the most difficult aspects of a healthy lifestyle for them are eating a well-balanced diet and exercising regularly. Another four in 10 Americans shared they struggle to get all the necessary nutrients in their diets each day.

“Starting new habits can be as easy as simplifying your existing nutritional routine, but it’s important to remember that it takes 21 days to create new habits and 90 days to create a lasting change in lifestyle,” Dr. Vonhoegen adds.

About Chris Melore

Chris Melore has been a writer, researcher, editor, and producer in the New York-area since 2006. He won a local Emmy award for his work in sports television in 2011.

Our Editorial Process

StudyFinds publishes digestible, agenda-free, transparent research summaries that are intended to inform the reader as well as stir civil, educated debate. We do not agree nor disagree with any of the studies we post, rather, we encourage our readers to debate the veracity of the findings themselves. All articles published on StudyFinds are vetted by our editors prior to publication and include links back to the source or corresponding journal article, if possible.

Our Editorial Team

Steve Fink

Editor-in-Chief

Chris Melore

Editor

Sophia Naughton

Associate Editor